Baby

Baby teeth are designed to last 6-12 years. Also referred to as primary teeth, baby teeth contribute to the overall development and health of every child. Their function is dependent on a disease-free status.

Proper speech development relies on the presence of childrens teeth. The tongue creates certain sounds with the presence of baby (primary) teeth.

Digestion begins in the mouth. A healthy diet is dependent on front and back teeth for tearing as well as crunching. As food is properly masticated in the mouth, the stomach can continue digestion for optimal nutrition.

A healthy mouth leads to healthy self esteem every time a child smiles. When teeth are fractured or badly decayed children resist smiling, talking and participating in class because of peer ridicule.

Badly decayed teeth are not only an esthetic issue but more importantly becomes a health issue. A deep cavity makes eating a painful process resulting in malnutrition. Pain also interferes with learning and concentration. Attendance suffers costing schools money for lack of attendance. Often a parent will have to take time off of work to stay home with a suffering child. Then more time-off is necessary for dental treatment.

As a tooth becomes decayed, the disease process can lead to infection and even death. Dental decay is a progressive disease and commands treatment. Advanced decay often results in infection. Prolong infections find pathways to the brain causing death.

An unhealthy mouth is a smelly mouth. Good and bad bacteria thrive in the oral cavity. Germs multiply, produce wastes, die, then rot and create a foul stench. Beside odor, wastes produce acids contributing to demineralization of enamel. Babies and very young children will develop cavities (decay), in their front upper teeth first.

Baby teeth reserve space until the permanent teeth erupt in the mouth. This is a very important role. Premature missing primary teeth will affect the eruption sequence of adult (permanent) teeth. Eruption and alignment of permanent teeth will suffer leading to increased chance of crowding and crooked teeth.

The bottom line is take good care of your child’s baby teeth. Most dental diseases are preventable and not painful in early stages but are expensive to restore. Children should see a dentist by age one, according to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

Start cleaning your baby’s mouth even before they have teeth. Gently wipe their mouth with a soft wash rag or gauze. Get … More

Assume that you can see signs as early as three months. There are big differences for the beginning of teeth. Some parents may notice the signs as early as three months, with the tooth breaking through the gum at the age of four to seven months. Most children have all 20 milk teeth when they are three years old. If you pay attention to the signs of teeth, you can be vigilant to examine the mouth on your baby's teeth to relieve his discomfort and clean the baby's mouth of bacteria.

  • Note that some babies do not show signs of teeth. In these cases, you may notice when you watch the baby's mouth for piercing teeth.

Examine your baby's mouth area. If you suspect that your baby is teeth, you might want to see if you see any signs around the mouth. You can look at the skin around your mouth and then look into your mouth.

  • Make sure your hands and fingers are clean before examining your baby's mouth so that bacteria that can cause an infection are kept in check.
  • See if you notice a drool or your baby's mouth is particularly wet. This is a good indication that your baby is teeth or not for long.
  • Watch for a rash on the face or a reddish skin if you check for drooling. A rash is often a sign that a baby is teeth. It may not be very dark, but if your baby's skin is redder or redder than normal, it could be a rash.
  • Gently pull away your baby's lip to see the gums. Note that you can see bulging gums, especially around the molars. In other cases, you may notice a buildup of fluid that forms a bluish vesicle. This is completely normal and you should leave it alone.
  • Massage your baby's gums when you feel like teeth or hard spots. This can give your baby some relief while you can find out if it is teething.

Watch for excessive sucking or biting. Most babies show some physical symptoms of teeth before the first tooth pushes through the gums. Many babies bite or suck on toys, fingers or other objects. If you notice that your baby is biting or sucking on things more often, this is probably a sign that it is already or soon teeth.

  • See if your baby is rubbing the gums with
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