Tooth

People who do not practice good oral hygiene often are surprised to know that after an extraction bacteria is still alive in their mouth.

Bacteria can be found before and after an extraction, and depending on how bad the infection is the dentist will prescribe correct antibiotics. These Antibiotics will reduce the possibility of getting an infection but it will not prevent infection.

These are a few indications that you may have an infection.

1. Swelling of the face.

2. Swollen gums.

3. Pain in your teeth under light pressure.

4. Bleeding around the extraction site.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms then you should visit your dentist as quickly as possible. After a full examination antibiotics will then be prescribed to be taken after or before the extraction is performed.

Needless to say that if you have already got a bad abscess the dentist will have to treat the infection first before trying to extract the tooth.

If you are one of the unlucky ones that get an infection after the tooth has been folded then the reason will be bacteria. Even if you had no infection previously bacteria is more precalvent before than after a tooth has been removed.

After an extraction you will be instructed by your dentist not to brush or use mouthwash for the next 24 -48 hours. During this time the bacteria in your mouth will be able to run rampant because you will not be using the means to kill all the germs that are now prevalent in your mouth.

If you experience bleeding after the extraction during the next 48 hours even if it is not heavy bleeding make an appointment to see your dentist right away. Your dentist will then prescribe the correct medication to stop the bleeding.

Most dentists prefer to treat an infection before extraction because they know that local anesthesia will not work well with infection. If you have a bad infection this makes it more difficult for medicine to numb the area of ​​an extraction.

The dentist may then decide to avoid administrating a large amount of medicine in the poorly infected area and choose to use an IV sedation, which is also known as "laughing gas". After the patient has been put to sleep the dentist can then remove the tooth that was giving so much trouble. This usually makes the dentist's job a … More

If you have any teeth removed, you'll want to do whatever is required to expedite the recuperation process and get back to your normal life. That being said, healing following tooth extracts requires the formation of blood clots to cover the area and promote recovery. Until that process occurs, there is not a lot you can do besides wait for nature to run its course. There are a number of things you can do to help with the recuperation process as well as control the discomfort. Below are a few guidelines to observe.

Do's

– It's typical for the extracted area to feel inflated even following a few days. In most cases, simple over the counter pain killers can provide relief to the discomfort. It is advisable that these pain killers be taken immediately following the tooth extraction procedure. Do not wait for the pain to start. It is always easier to prevent discomfort from setting in than making it go away. Your dentist or oral surgeon will recommend the appropriate over-the-counter pain killer or write you a prescription.

– Go home, rest, as well as take it easy the following day. Do not workout or exert much physical effort for the next 24 hours.

– If the number does not go away after six hours, get in touch with the dentist or oral surgeon who administrated the tooth extraction. Steroids can be administered to the nerve area which could help decrease the inflammation and expedite the recovery.

Don'ts

– Avoid the temptation to rinse the extracted area for the next 24 hours.

– Stay clear of eating and / or drinking hot food and beverages until the numbing wears off. You will not be able to feel the temperature level of food or beverages if the area is still anesthetized, and this can cause problems in your mouth. Also, chew carefully to ensure that you do not unintentionally bite your cheek.

– Never poke the extracted area, even with your tongue.

– Refrain from sucking and sipping, spitting and even blowing your nose since both positive and negative pressure might induce the dislodging of the blood clot, which may impede the recovery process. If you have colds or allergies and you feel like you absolutely must sneeze and blow, then take the right medications to alleviate the symptoms.

– Refrain from consuming any alcoholic beverages for at least 24 … More

How much do you know about your teeth?

Your teeth begin to grow while you're still a baby inside your mother's womb. While they are not visible until a few years after birth when they "erupt" or come up from within the gums, they are there. Baby teeth, or primary teeth grow in and fall out in the same order and are replaced with permanent, or adult teeth. Your permanent teeth will be the teeth you have for the rest of your life. If you lose an adult tooth, it may be able to be re-attached at the root if you see a dentist immediately. In many cases, a permanent permanent tooth means a fake tooth, such as a dental implant will be needed to replace the lost, natural tooth.

Your teeth are able to withstand much wear and tear as well as grinding and pressure. What makes teeth so hard and long-lasting? It likely has something to do with their composition.

Each tooth is made up of enamel, dentin and cementum and each tooth has a dental pulp.

Tooth Enamel

The part of the teeth you're most familiar with is the tooth enamel. This is the hard, translucent, outer covering of the tooth. It is this part of the tooth that cavities can destroy and leave the tooth vulnerable to further decay and disease. The enamel is said to be the hardest and most mineral-packed substance of the body. Tooth enamel is made up of mostly minerals, with some organic compounds and water. The enamel is the thickest (and strongest) at the cusp of the tooth and is weakest along the tooth edges.

As we age, the years of use abuse and wear and tear, the enamel slowly wears off in what is called attrition.

What is enamel made of? Crystalline calcium phosphate called hydroxyapatite accounts for most of the minerals found in tooth enamel. These minerals give teeth their strength, as well as their brittleness. Enamel also does not contain collagen like other parts of the tooth. Tuftelins, ameloblastsins, ameloblenins and enamelins are proteins that help develop enamel.

Dentin

Underneath the enamel is a porous, yellowish material called dentin. It is this material that gives teeth their classic yellow, or preferably white color. Dentin is made up of inorganic and organic materials as well as water. It is made of mineralized connective tissue and collagen proteins. Dentinogenesis, or … More

A tooth fracture can occur in both the front and back teeth, but the causes differ for each region. The front teeth most often become fractured due to sports trauma or some other external event, and may show signs of mobility due to underlying bone or tissue damage or exhibit damage to the vital tissue known as the pulp.

Posterior teeth often crack or fraction off due to active termination or improperly placed restorations. Although these fractures may not present as urgent an aesthetic problem as those bound to the front teeth, serious damage to both the tooth and supporting structures and tissue can occur without prompt treatment. This article looks at the various type of tooth cracks and how treatment is approached for each.

Superficial Cracks in the Front Teeth

Cracks that occur on the front teeth can be privileged or implicate deeper layers of the tooth. They can occur due to external trauma or natural causes. Tooth structure on either side of the crack is still structurally secure but its integrity can disintegrate with time, evolving into a complete fraction (the sides can break off with little force).

"Craze" lines are an example of a naturally-occurring crack that is restricted to the outer enamel layer. Tooth enamel protects the interior layers of the teeth, but can be successfully restored with composite bonding or refinishing of the enamel surface. The same can be said for traumatic injuries to just the enamel.

During composite bonding, the dentist simply etches the tooth and applications a white filling-like material to the crack.

Deeper Cracks in the Front Teeth

Deeper cracks can introduce complications to treatment. If the crack extends into the second layer, known as the dentin, it can still be successfully repaired with composite bonding or an indirect restoration (veneers). The goal of treatment is to achieve aesthetic correction but to also keep the crack from propagating deeper into the tooth structure.

Cracks that have extended into or near the pulp present a cause for concern. The pulp constituents of vital tissues that facilitate the growth and regenerative processes of the tooth. A crack that exposes the pulp to the oral environment can introduce bacteria into the pulp chamber, where it can cause infection and consequent death of the tooth. Depending on the age of the patient and the amount of damage already done to the pulp, two main options exist. … More

You brush your teeth religiously, eat a reasonably healthy diet, you floss at least some of the time, and you regularly use a mouthwash. You use a fluoride based toothpaste. You are reasonably good at maintaining a regular schedule of dental appointments. In fact, you follow all the mainstream advice on dental care. However, when you get to the dentist, there is always some dental decay, always a filling or cavity that needs attention. When you do get a filling, it often needs a larger filling, then a really large filling, followed by a crown and root canal. If the root canal fails, then the only thing left is an implant, a large gap in your gums, or some kind of bridge device.

You in turn get more and frustrated. You purchase bigger and more powerful sonic toothbrushes, bigger tubs of mouthwash, and start brushing your teeth after lunch at work. No joy. Nothing sees to work. You talk to your dentist, who just shrugs and says it happens.

What's going on? Very simply, dental decay and gum disease is an infection, "an invasion by pathogenic microorganisms of a bodily part in which the conditions are favorable for growth, production of toxins, and resulting injury to tissue." (Webster's II New Riverside University Dictionary).

What are these microorganisms? Pathogens of bacterial, protozoan, viral or fungal origin have been implicated as causal factors in periodontal disease. One strain in particular has been identified called Streptococcus mutans. Streptococcus mutans, and Streptococcus Sobrinus are the bacteria that cause the majority of tooth decay and gum disease. Streptococcus mutans is a heterotrophic organism which simply means that it must live off another organism by eating another organism or using them as a host. The human oral cavity is the host of S. mutans.
The bacteria feeds by metabolizing sucrose to lactic acid, causing a change in the ph to become acidic, and sticks to the tooth in the form of plaque. The combination of the plaque in an acid environment sticking onto the tooth and below into the gums causes the highly mineralized tooth enamel to break down until a small hole is created. Once the enamel has been penetrated, the Streptococcus mutans really get to work. It subsists on a diverse group of carbohydrates, and once in the cozy warm confines of your nce cozy tooth, starts to party like a rock star to … More

A toothache is generally the cause of tooth decay or infection. There may be a sudden pain when some food comes in contact with a dental cavity. If you do not brush properly, some food particles stuck between the teeth which may cause infection or cavity. Infection can be at the root level or in the gums. This is also called as a tooth abscess. Its main symptoms may include pain while chewing food, bleeding in gums, and bad smell in the mouth. If you have severe pain or deep cavities then you must visit the doctor but before that, you can also take some natural cures at home to have relief from a toothache or to cure cavity. So here are some natural cures that can be taken at home:

Rinse with Salt Water: Mix 1 tbsp of salt in one glass of warm water, rinse your mouth with this. Warm salt water is a natural disinfectant which can be used to lose the food particles that are stuck in the teeth.

Rinse with Hydrogen Peroxide: You can rinse your mouth with hydrogen peroxide directly or by diluting it in water. It is temporary pain reliever. It will kill the bacteria and will give you relief from pain.

Cold compress or Icing: Cold compress is one of the best methods to get relief from pain. Use an ice bag or wrap ice in the towel and keep it on the affected area for about 15-20 minutes. Repeat this every few hours.

Alum: It is also known as fitkari India, and is used by Ayurveda. Apply alum powder to tooth or bleeding gum, keep it for half an hour. Repeat the process for few hours in a day.

Clove: It has been used throughout the history for a toothache as it reduces inflammation. Dab cotton ball with clove oil and apply on affected area. You can also chew cabbage directly and release its oil and keep it on the same place for half an hour. Diluting clove oil in water can be used as mouthwash also.

Garlic: Garlic has many medicinal properties. Grate garlic clove and make a paste from it, apply it on the affected area, it will kill bacteria. You can chew garlic directly also.

Apple Cider Vinegar: It has antiseptic properties which may kill bacteria causing toothache. Apply vinegar using a cotton ball on the tooth and … More

A wisdom tooth can be extracted (removed) by an oral surgeon or your family dentist. This can be done at the dental professional's facility and the surgery itself is usually done in a single visit, with aftercare being minimal in nature. If you are having all your wisdom teeth extracted or of you are at a high risk for complications (your dentist will determine that) then you may have your surgery performed at a hospital. If you do have prior infections, surgery will probably be delayed until the infection itself is cleared up. If this is the case, your doctor will have you take antibiotics to heal these complicating factors.

Your dentist will administrator local anesthetic before removing a wisdom tooth. If some or all of your wisdom teeth will be removed at the same time, a general anesthetic will be used to prevent pain in the entire body. This will cause you to sleep through the procedure. It is generally recommended that you do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before surgery, so that the anesthetic can be administrated properly.

During the procedure, your dentist will open up the gum tissue over the tooth and take out any bone that is covering it, to remove the wisdom tooth. You may need stitches, after the tooth is removed. In most cases, stitches dissolve over time. Some stitches do not dissolve; however, and will need to be removed after a few days but this technique is used less often. Cotton gauze pad is generally used to stop any bleeding from the surgery.

What to Expect After Surgery:

Recovery usually only requires a few days. Here are some tips that will help speed up your recovery:

• Take pain killers prescribed by your dentist only as needed.
• Change gauze pads as they become soaked with blood and bite GENTLY on them to absorb blood.
• Avoid lying flat, this may prolong bleeding. Try to prop your head up with pillows, if required.
• Avoid physical activity as this Promotes faster blood flow to the injured area.
• Soft foods are generally recommended to alleviate stress to the surgery site.
• Using a straw can loosen the blood clotting process so do not use a straw while recovering.
• Gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water multiple times a day to reduce swelling and treat pain. This is … More

Dental filling, otherwise known as dental or tooth restoration, is the method by which dentists restore missing parts of the tooth structure or even a missing tooth. Dentist do it in such a way that the integrity, function, and morphology of the tooth structure remain intact. This process uses different types of dental restoration materials. A missing tooth structure supported by dental implants can also be restored through this procedure.

The Need for Tooth Restoration

Caries or dental cavities due to decay are one of the main reasons for the structural loss of a tooth. A part of or a whole tooth could be missing due to an external trauma such as an accident or fraction of the tooth. A previously placed restoration would have deteriorated creating the need for re-restoring it. Intentional loss of structure of the tooth may occur when dentists prepare the tooth for aesthetic improvements.

Restoring a Tooth Directly or Indirectly

The technique of direct restoration involves keeping a prepared soft filling into the tooth. The filling sets and becomes hard while in contact with the tooth. This procedure does not damage the tooth because it passes very limited energy on to the tooth during the setting process. Experts advise this method for restoration in areas that are unacceptably to under heavy pressure during chewing. A single visit to the dentist would suffice for this procedure. On the contrary, indirect dental restorations involve the technique of using dental impressions of the prepared tooth to fabricate tooth restoration externally. Crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays are the common indirect restorations. This is then permanently fixed with dental cement. This process requires a minimum of two visits to the dentist.

Different Tooth Restoration Types

There are many ways for teeth restoration and the most common type is the filling restoration, done with materials such as tooth-colored plastic, silver amalgam, gold, or glass materials. Crowns gets capped to a tooth so that its shape, size, appearance, and strength remain intact. Crowns cover a dental implant or hold a dental bridge in place. When one or more missing teeth creates a gap, false teeth known as bridges helps in filling up the space. When the tooth roots needs replacement, dentists go for implants treatment. This is a small metallic post placed into the bone socket of the missing teeth and then crowned. Dentures, made of acrylic resin, replace missing teeth and … More

Teeth are lost because of trauma or disease. Trauma may come in the form of an accident or excessive biting forces. Disease is generally tooth decay or periodontal disease [gum disease] but there are other categories such as cancer and various neoplasm's of the jaw that may result in tooth loss. Studies show that more than 50% of the population has one or more missing teeth. Trauma commonly causes the loss of a single front tooth. The effect this has on a persons' well being is obvious. Fortunately an experienced dental implantant can usually remove the remaining root, place a dental implant, and secure a new tooth to that implant in one visit of an hour or two. The loss of a single tooth in the back is usually caused by tooth decay or periodontal disease. Sometimes this can be treated just like front teeth but for various reasons it is often more time consuming.

More often than not the treatment for a single missing back tooth is as follows:

  1. Extraction of the damaged tooth and grafting of the root sockets. Wait 4 months then
  2. Placement of a dental implant to replace the root of the single missing tooth. Wait 4 to 6 months then
  3. Placement of an abutment on the dental implant and record taking for the fabrication of a crown to replace the single missing tooth. Wait 3 weeks then
  4. Permanent attachment of the abutment to the implant and cementation of the crown to the abutment. TREATMENT COMPLETE

The need for replacing a single missing tooth in the back is often times not as intuitively obvious as the need for replacing a single missing tooth in the front; but it is important. Teeth are very movable. We've all witnessed an Orthodontist putting tension on a tooth with a small rubber band and moving it where ever he wants. Each tooth in the mouth has a position and a purpose. When there is a single missing tooth the body's natural reaction is to drift adjacent teeth into the void that is created. Over time a single missing tooth may actually cause a change in the position of every other tooth in the mouth. Malocclusion may then develop contributing to TMJ [tempromandibular joint] dysfunction, headaches, muscle spasms in the neck and shoulders, food impaction between teeth, tooth decay, periodontal disease, and other problems. Because these problems do not always develop … More

A dental implant is a structure made out of metal which helps in replacing the root of a missing tooth. To give you the look and feel of a real tooth a crown will be fitted on the abutment in the dental crown. The entire procedure of fitting the tooth root with metal, screws and theby replacing damaged or missing teeth with the artificial means is termed as dental implant surgery. It is a wonderful and impressive alternative for dentures or bridgework.

The type of implant and condition of your jawbone will decide the course of dental implant surgery. Here you must know that the surgery will take place in different stages and will involve a lot of procedures. The reason why your dentist will suggest you to undergo dental implant surgery is because of its various benefits. The biggest benefit is that the implant provides unyielding support to the new teeth which gets fitted. The process may take longer because osseointeration requires a lot of time.

Tooth implants are placed surgically in the jawbone and they serve as a root for the teeth which are missing. Furthermore the metal used is titanium which fuses with the jawbone and provides a firm base. Because of titanium the implants do not slip or make noise or even cause any sort of damage to the bone. On the other hand the chances of slipping, noise and damage are higher if you have bridgework or dentures. Moreover the metal does not finish no matter what you eat.

You might be the right candidate for tooth implants if: –

1. You have one or more than one teeth missing
2. You have a full grown jawbone
3. If you have enough bone which will help in fitting the implants or if it can accomodate bone graft.
4. If you have healthy tissues in your gums.
5. If you do not have any health related concerns which may impact the healing procedure.
6. If you do not wish to carry dentures.
7. If you wish to improve the way you talk.
8. If you agree to give fundamental time to dental implant surgery.

Dental Implant is a surgical procedure because there are some chances of risk involved. These health risks are very rare and are easily cured because they are not that grave. The possible health risks include the following: –

• The implant gets … More